Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

President Biden arrived in the United Kingdom on Wednesday, kicking off his eight-day trip abroad by declaring that "the United States is back" and that the democracies of the world "are standing together."

Speaking to U.S. troops at Royal Air Force Mildenhall, Biden also had strong words for Russian President Vladimir Putin, whom he will meet with next week.

Updated June 8, 2021 at 8:15 PM ET

Vice President Harris wrapped up a three-day visit to Guatemala and Mexico on Tuesday, a trip where she sought to focus on the root causes of migration from Central America to the United States that became overshadowed by questions about why she hasn't traveled to the border, where record numbers of people have been trying to seek asylum.

Updated June 7, 2021 at 10:55 PM ET

Vice President Harris, in her first foreign trip since taking office, had a direct message for Guatemalans thinking of migrating to the United States: "Do not come."

The nation's largest employer, the federal government, is beginning to plan for bringing many of its workers back into their offices, now that the coronavirus pandemic seems to be winding down in America.

Already, employees of the White House have been told to come back, or in many cases come to the office for the first time, next month. The Biden administration has also told other federal agencies to submit final plans for what it calls "the safe reentry of employees to the physical workplace" by July 19.

Former Vice President Mike Pence said Thursday night that he doubts that he and former President Donald Trump will ever see "eye to eye" over the Jan. 6 insurrection led by a mob of pro-Trump supporters at the U.S. Capitol.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated May 28, 2021 at 3:31 PM ET

Bipartisan legislation to establish an independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has failed in the Senate, as Republicans staged their first filibuster since President Biden took office to block the plan.

The Transportation Security Administration, in the wake of the ransomware attack on the Colonial Pipeline that caused widespread gasoline disruptions earlier this month, has announced new reporting requirements for pipeline operators.

Updated May 25, 2021 at 6:25 PM ET

President Biden lauded the courage of George Floyd's family after meeting with them on the first anniversary of his murder by a Minneapolis police officer, a killing that launched protests and calls for police reform nationwide.

The family visited with Biden and Vice President Harris at the White House on Tuesday and also met with congressional leaders in Washington, D.C.

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