Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk. In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent, and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress, and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Journalism Award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated September 21, 2021 at 12:25 PM ET

In a speech to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, President Biden framed the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan as ending "a period of relentless war" and starting "a new era of relentless diplomacy."

The Biden administration is easing restrictions on foreign nationals wishing to fly to the United States.

Starting in early November, they will be allowed to enter this country if they can show proof that they have been vaccinated for COVID-19 and that they have tested negatively for the virus within three days of their flight.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas says the court "may have become the most dangerous branch of government," but it still works, and faulted the media for making justices seem like politicians.

Thomas spoke Thursday night at the University of Notre Dame, the alma mater of the court's newest justice, Amy Coney Barrett.

Updated September 15, 2021 at 2:55 PM ET

In vivid and emotional testimony at a Senate hearing Wednesday, four elite American gymnasts testified about the abuse they had suffered by former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar and their feelings of betrayal by investigators, including from the FBI which they say let them down.

Olympic gymnast Simone Biles tearfully said she blames Nassar and also "an entire system that allowed his abuse," including USA Gymnastics and the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee.

After the 9/11 attacks 20 years ago, security officials in Washington, D.C., sprang into action. The Pentagon had been attacked, and it's thought that United Flight 93 that went down near Shanksville, Pa., was headed for the U.S. Capitol building.

Seemingly overnight, planters and thigh-high cement bollards sprouted from the sidewalks, and Jersey barriers lined the streets.

President Biden said he was "disappointed" by Republican governors who are opposing his call for widespread vaccinations of teachers and school staff members. To those who wish to sue the federal government over mandates, he said, "Have at it."

Speaking at Brookland Middle School in Washington, D.C., Biden said he was saddened that some GOP governors "have been so cavalier with the health of these kids, so cavalier with the health of their communities.

"We're playing for real here," Biden said. "This isn't a game."

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Updated August 31, 2021 at 7:54 PM ET

Speaking one day after the last U.S. troops left Afghanistan, ending America's longest war, President Biden on Tuesday forcefully defended his decision to end the U.S. military involvement in the beleaguered country, calling it "the right decision, the wise decision, the best decision for America."

Updated August 19, 2021 at 3:47 PM ET

A man who claimed to have a bomb in his pickup truck in front of the Library of Congress has surrendered, ending an hours-long standoff.

The suspect — identified by authorities as 49-year-old Floyd Ray Roseberry from Grover, N.C. — is now in custody.

It's not clear if there was an actual bomb.

President Biden gave the order last Thursday to send U.S. troops into Afghanistan as it became clear that the Taliban were overrunning Afghan government forces on their way to taking Kabul.

White House national security adviser Jake Sullivan told reporters Tuesday that as administration officials watched the situation unfold, the decision was made to supplement the first contingent of some 3,000 troops with some 3,000 more. Sullivan's briefing was the first from the White House since Kabul, Afghanistan's capital, fell to the Taliban on Sunday.

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