© 2021 Red River Radio
background2_fid.jpg
Voice of the Community
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
NEWS

Nicholas Moves Slowly And Brings Heavy Rainfall

1-1-s.louisiana_rainfall_nicholas_091421_ap_photo.jpg__2.jpg
Courtesy: Chuck Smith / Red River Radio News

NICHOLAS CRAWLS INTO LA. Nicholas has weakened into a tropical depression as it crawls across southern Louisiana, unleashing heavy rain across the coasts of Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.   It's unwelcome weather for survivors of Hurricane Ida, which destroyed thousands of rooftops now covered with tarps.  The National Weather Service says the lower Deep South is in for days of rain as Nicholas lingers over central Louisiana. Gov. John Bel Edwards has warned residents to expect flash flooding and to avoid traveling in areas with heavy rainfall.

gov_jbe_091421.jpg
Credit Courtesy: LPB
Governor John Bel Edwards of Louisiana

"Quite often we do have individuals who drown especially when we have these types of rain events where the primary risk is through flash-flooding," Edwards explained.

Edwards said some areas in Southern and Central Louisiana are expected to receive anywhere from 4 to 10 inches of rainfall as Nicholas slowly moves eastward. Power outages is another concern as more than 100,000 people are without power and restoration could be hampered by severe weather.  Many deaths from Hurricane Ida were  from excessive heat as elderly residents had no power for air conditioning.  Dr. Joseph Kanter, Medical Director for the Louisiana Department of Health asks people to check on their neighbors.

dr._joseph_kanter_ldh_091521.jpg
Credit Courtesy: LPB
Dr. Joseph Kanter, Medical Director, LDH

"Please check on the folks around you who are elderly and are vulnerable" Dr. Joseph Kanter, Medical Director, La. Dept. of Health

"Do not assume that your neighbors and loved ones are okay, do not assume that they have power just because you have power," Kanter said. "Please check on the folks around you who are elderly and are vulnerable."

Dr. Kanter said there are medical special needs centers set up throughout the state to help, and to call 911 for emergency assistance.