Kelsey Snell

Kelsey Snell is a Congressional correspondent for NPR. She has covered Congress since 2010 for outlets including The Washington Post, Politico and National Journal. She has covered elections and Congress with a reporting specialty in budget, tax and economic policy. She has a graduate degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. and an undergraduate degree in political science from DePaul University in Chicago.

Michael Bloomberg's first debate performance didn't go well, but he continues to pour millions into television ads in Super Tuesday states — an advantage other Democrats are not taking lightly.

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For centrist Democrats the most important theme to emerge from the New Hampshire primary was "don't count us out."

For weeks they have been grappling with the reality that Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, is shaping up to be their party's front-runner for president. Moderates say surging support for two more moderate Democrats is a signal that their wing of the party has a chance to take the nomination. But there is growing pressure on centrists to unite around a single candidate before Sanders becomes unbeatable.

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The impeachment trial of President Donald J. Trump is over.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN ROBERTS: It is, therefore, ordered and adjudged that the said Donald John Trump be and he is hereby acquitted of the charges in said articles.

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