David Greene

People around the world are reporting that birds are much louder these days.

But Sue Anne Zollinger, an ornithologist from Manchester Metropolitan University, cautions: Don't believe everything you hear.

With the decrease in traffic, there's less noise pollution. That means birds have less noise to compete with, she says. (Scroll down to the end of this story to listen for yourself.)

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How many Americans will end up dying from COVID-19?

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So towards the end of April, President Trump said he expected COVID-19 would kill up to 60,000 Americans.

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But now he says that number will likely be higher. Here's the president at a Fox News town hall last night.

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Some states are announcing their plans to gradually reopen.

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First he announced it in a tweet. And then at yesterday's task force briefing at the White House, President Trump detailed his plans to temporarily block some immigrants from coming into the United States.

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President Trump says he will temporarily suspend immigration into this country because of the coronavirus.

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Many Americans are spending a lot more time with their partners these days.

And some of those relationships are being tested by the inevitable "pressure-cooker" moments that come with weeks of being confined to the home in an effort to stem the spread of the coronavirus.

"What we're seeing is that there's a clash between the terrible anxiety about catching the virus and having to stay sequestered 24/7," says relationship therapist Julie Gottman.

So if a relationship is already on the rocks that anxiety, Gottman says, "has nowhere to go but towards the partner."

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The White House and congressional leaders say they are getting close to agreeing on a new round of coronavirus relief funding.

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During the coronavirus pandemic, many hospitals have restricted family visits because the risk of infection is just too high.

For many families, the only connection they have to a loved one in their final moments in the ICU is through a hospital chaplain.

As New York City experiences a staggering loss of life this week, Rocky Walker, a chaplain at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan, has been working outside the shut doors of patient rooms. There, while on the phone or video chat with a patient's family member, he'll describe what he's seeing in the room.

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So if you have been exposed to the coronavirus, when can you safely go back to work?

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